Rushton Hurley

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Rushton Hurley

Excellence, Technology, and the Should-but-Don’ts

Keynote

Excellence, Technology, and the Should-but-Don’ts

It can be daunting to keep up with the seemingly constant changes that happen around us. One thing that hasn’t changed, and will never change, is the importance of what we say and do and how that shapes the environment in which we teach. How easy is it to use this to create a culture of exploration at your school and in your classroom? How can changing technologies make us better at what we do? Students want to join us in doing all sorts of interesting things, so how do we create the conditions in which they will choose to act on that desire? Join in to explore how we can take our work to the next level.

The Fun and Cool of Getting Better

We all know that we can get better. A cool idea here, an adapted technique there, and soon, we’re reaching the next student – the one who has been such a challenge. One of the best pieces of teaching is getting kids like that to believe in themselves, so why not try something new that allows you and them to experience something fun, cool, and hopeful? Join in for ideas, techniques, and advice that can make you a little (or a lot) better now.

About Rushton

Rushton Hurley is an educator who believes this is a great time to teach. In his work, he has taught Japanese language, been principal of an online school, directed a professional development program, and succeeded as a social benefit entrepreneur. He loves creativity, collaborative innovation, sharing stories, and laughing at himself. Rushton founded and is executive director of the educational nonprofit Next Vista for Learning, which houses a free library of hundreds of short videos by and for teachers and students. His graduate research at Stanford University included using speech recognition technology with beginning students of Japanese in computer-based role-playing scenarios for developing language skills. In the 1990’s his work with teenagers at a high school in California led him to begin using internet and video technologies to make learning more active, helping him reach students who had struggled under more traditional approaches.

Rushton has trained teachers around the world, and regularly presents at national and international conferences. His fun and thoughtful talks center on the connection between engaging learning and useful, affordable technology, and the professional perspectives of teachers at all levels.